Tag Archives: Waldorf Homeschooling

How Much Math or Science Homework is Too Much?

Waldorf Principle Explored: The Main Lesson The Main Lesson is the central part of the Waldorf inspired educational day and often only lasts 1 to 2 hours. Parents and teachers who are making the transition from an 8 to 3:00 day to a homeschooling day often worry that they may not be...
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Exercising Early in Life is Rewarded

Waldorf Principle Explored: Nature Walks & Outdoor Play Playing outdoors and taking daily nature walks are an important part of Waldorf education. They are not considered “just recess” or “gym class” but are considered an integral part of the entire educational process. Classes from ages preschool through high school take daily nature walks and are...
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Access to Nature Improves Quality of Learning

Waldorf Principle Explored: Nature in Education Incorporating nature walks, natural materials and natural features into the Waldorf classroom are important aspects of the Waldorf inspired learning environment. The article below talks about how this environment is not only beneficial for the students now, but can also help them grow to be healthier...
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Why Food is Just as Important to Mental Health as Physical Health

Waldorf Principle Explored: Healthy Eating Waldorf education embraces educating the child’s head, heart & hands as well as their body. Preparing a snack together and baking homemade bread from scratch are just a couple Waldorf inspired activities that are daily occurrences in the Waldorf inspired classroom. This article talks about how important those experiences...
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Could a Dose of Nature be Just What the Doctor Ordered?

Waldorf Principles Explored: Nature in Education Waldorf education teaches the importance of nature in education. From nature walks to using natural materials in the classroom, Waldorf education provides numerous opportunities for children to be closer to nature. This article discusses the importance of this early and ongoing exposure to nature… Science Daily Numerous studies...
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Disruptive Children Benefit from Tailored Intervention

Waldorf Principle Explored: The Temperaments At some point in exploring Waldorf education you have probably heard about the importance of knowing your student’s temperament and how you can use it to be a more effective teacher in the classroom. This concept is important but also unique to Waldorf education. The article below...
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Disruption of Sleep in Children Can Hamper Memory

Waldorf Principle Explored: 3-Day-Rhythm The concept of the 3-day-rhythm in Waldorf education (explained HERE) states that it is important for a child to be able to “sleep on” new ideas and concepts so they can retain what they have learned. This is one reason that lessons are given over a three day...
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Why Handwriting is Still Important

Waldorf Principle Explored: 3-Day-Rhythm Creating one’s own Main Lesson Book, complete with handwritten pages is a task unique to Waldorf students. With the increase of computer usage in traditional classrooms and the rise of computer-centric online schools we think it is important to remember why handwriting is so important. This article explores that...
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The Connection Between Lack Of Sleep And A Shrinking Brain

Waldorf Principle Explored: 3-Day-Rhythm If you embrace Waldorf education you have probably heard about the importance of the 3-day-rhythm. One of the central principles of this method is that allowing the child to “sleep on” a lesson will allow them to absorb the information more deeply and explore it more efficiently the following two days. Huffington Post While...
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New Insight: How Children Learn Math

This is part of our “Waldorf Education in the News” series. We use this series of posts to direct you to news relating to Waldorf educational principles highlighted in the news or supported by scientific studies. To see more articles like this click the “Waldorf in the News” link to...
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Teaching Spanish Waldorf Style

Member Question: How do you teach Spanish language using the Waldorf concept? I looked around online, and the only thing I found is a reference to a book, “Andando Caminos” by Elena Forrer. Any ideas teaching and introducing Spanish to elementary children. I tutor Spanish to English speaking children and I rely...
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The Importance of Singing in the Home & Classroom

By Michelle Marinelli Prindle Singing is the single most important musical experience a child can have.  It lays the foundation for all future musicality in life.  In many years of teaching private music lessons and classes, I have seen that all children can learn to make music.  Yet it is...
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Storytelling Tips for Teachers & Parents

Question: Are there examples of written story summaries anywhere? I am struggling with creating concise, accurate summaries for long stories. Currently I am writing what my daughter and I create together, but it goes on and on sometimes. TIA! Right now I am working on all the September lessons –...
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Why Do We Put the Whole Before the Parts (Math)?

In Waldorf education there are variations on how the times tables are taught. However, one constant remains – that we always work from the whole to the parts. But what does that mean and why do we do that? In Waldorf classrooms different teachers recite the times tables with their...
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10 Tips on Teaching Different Ages Together

1. Always have an older child teach a younger child something when possible. That way you have two children occupied and one less Main Lesson to teach 🙂 I remember my second grader used to help me with all my classes when she was little. She was like a mini...
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Summer Verse for G1 & G2 Members

How the corn has grown ripe in the Summer’s hot days, And the reaping began with the sun’s early rays, Mike and Jack since the morn, Have been cutting the corn, Which is bound up by Peggy and Sue; And sweet, flaunting poppies and flow’rets of blue Wag their heads o’er...
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How Do I Move on from Kindergarten Stories with Props?

Question from John and Karen: Right now all my stories for my pre/K child are done with figures and props. When it comes to 1st grade are main lesson stories only told using chalkboard drawings or can puppetry type storytelling still be used? Reply from Waldorf Teacher Diane Power: To tell stories...
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How Can I Help My Kids Catch Up in the Summer?

Question from Angil: Do you have suggestions for “summer school” to round out the missing lessons from 3rd grade – math, and reading (very slow reader and fluctuations in interest)? Reply from Waldorf Teacher Diane Power: “Summer school” I always encouraged the parents to allow their child to play outdoors as much...
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My Son Had Trouble Knitting in First Grade

Question from Gina: My son had a hard time with knitting in first grade. He didnt want to stick with in for more than a few minutes at a time, complaining of his hands hurting or wanting to do somethimg else. Now we are moving on to second grade where...
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Can I Teach the Solar System in First Grade?

Question from Melissa: There has been recent discussion on several Waldorf pages pertaining to teaching younger children about the solar system or the night sky in general. It looks to me like the solar system is not taught until about 6th grade. Is there a specific reason for that? My girls...
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